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Green Card Application to Become a Permanent Resident
While in the U.S. (Adjust Status)

Green Card - Adjusting to Permanent Resident Status

Green Card Application Legal Permanent Resident Apply Forms Eligibility Immigrant

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If you would like to obtain a Green Card and become a legal permanent resident in the United States, you must first be eligible.  See:  Green Card Eligibility to Become a Permanent Resident While in the U.S. (Adjust Status)  If you are eligible for a Green Card, you may then file the following items with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS):

Evidence of Eligibility

  • If you have already been approved for an immigrant petition, you must submit a copy of the approval notice sent to you by USCIS.

  • If someone else is or has filed a petition for you that, if approved, will make an immigrant number immediately available to you, you must submit a copy of the completed petition that is being filed for you. Such applications include only immediate relative, special immigrant juvenile or special immigrant military petitions. For more information, see Immigrant Visa Numbers: National Visa Center and the US Visa Bulletin.

  • If you were admitted into the United States as a fiancee of a U.S. citizen and married that citizen within the required 90 days, you must submit a copy of the fiancé petition approval notice and a copy of your marriage certificate.

  • If you are an asylee or refugee, you must submit a copy of the letter or USCIS Form I-94 (Arrival-Departure Record) that shows the date you were granted asylum or refuge in the United States. You also must submit USCIS Form I-643 (Health and Human Services Statistical Data).

  • If you are a Cuban citizen or native, you must use USCIS Form I-485 (Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status) and submit evidence of your citizenship or nationality.

  • If you have been a continuous resident of the United States since before January 1, 1972, you must submit evidence showing that you entered the United States prior to January 1, 1972 and that you have lived in the United States continuously since your entry into the country.

  • If your parent became a legal permanent resident (Green Card holder) after you were born, you must submit evidence that your parent has been or will be granted permanent residence (Green Card). You must also submit a copy of your birth certificate, and proof of your relationship with your parent.

  • If your wife or husband became a legal permanent resident (Green Card holder) after you were married, you must submit evidence that your wife or husband has been granted a Green Card (permanent residence). You must also submit a copy of your marriage certificate and proof that any previous marriages entered into by you or your wife or husband were legally terminated.

Immigration forms are available online, or by calling 1-800-870-3676, or by submitting an online request to receive immigration forms by mail. Further information on immigration forms, filing fees, and fee waivers is available in USCIS Forms / INS Forms and Other US Immigration Forms, Fees & Filing Locations.

For more information, return to: Green Card: Become a Permanent Resident While in the U.S. (Adjust Status)

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